Archives: Podcast

Dharma talk by Kosen Greg Snyder: Being of Service (12/14/2018)

Dharma talk by Kosen Greg Snyder: Being of Service (12/14/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

2018 Rohatsu Sesshin – Day 3

Someone hands us a broom and we take it. We don’t go through all the reasons why we don’t want the broom right then and then. Because, really, who cares wether I want the broom at that moment or not. It’s not to say I still don’t argue. I do. My mind argues. But who cares? If it’s coming from a sense of service, who cares? If we are confusing the two [being of service or being a servant] then it matters a whole lot.

Some religious communities confuse the two. They use the sense of service to convince you that being in a kind of servant position is a good thing. You should just accept your lot because it’s good to be of service. Well, those are not the same thing.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin: Hindrances (12/13/2018)

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin: Hindrances (12/13/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

2018 Rohatsu Sesshin – Day 2

You can all be visited by your demons in the middle of the night, in a period of zazen. They will come and find you. They are doing their part in helping you to wake up. So, can you relax with them? Can you welcome then? Can you play with them? Joyfully, playfully? “What are you doing here and what are you offering me right now? What is it that you believe in?” We engage it. We don’t tight up against it or push it away. Or indulge it either.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk with Greg Snyder: The Sangha is the Successor (12/12/2018)

Dharma talk with Greg Snyder: The Sangha is the Successor (12/12/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

2018 Rohatsu Sesshin – Day 1

In the history of Buddhism, the location of working with karma is not only one’s self, but the Sangha. The Sangha is always a part of it. There were many people around the Buddha at the time who were practicing moksha practices, or practices of liberation. But the Buddha assembled a Sangha. The Buddha understood the necessity of vow and of holding the harm of the world. So even when he died and they were looking for a successor, his response was: “No successor, the Sangha is the successor.” So that is our way, to do this in community. Our way is to foreground community.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin, (11/17/2018)

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin, (11/17/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

In Ancient Buddhist cosmology we say that the whole world is created, maintained and sustained by our collective karma. So, we literally are constantly living in a karmic stream of influences. Every moment is a chance for us to either act out our karma or work with our karma in a particular way, from a practice perspective, in which it causes no more harm and it becomes a force for healing in the world.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Shokuchi Deirdre Carrigan (09/22/2018)

Dharma talk by Shokuchi Deirdre Carrigan (09/22/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

I like this form of “practice period.” I used to wonder: why do we have to stop? This is great, let’s just keep going. But this period of integration afterwards is actually really important, because it’s when the practice becomes not something out there, but a part of our lives. And also, it’s a great opportunity to see when it’s not part of our lives. So we get to observe, for a while, our habit life. I would say habit might be the exact opposite of practice. And then we can re-enter practice again.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website. Thank you!

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin on karma (09/15/2018)

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin on karma (09/15/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

It’s important to think about how harmful the word karma can be used. It comes out of a very different time and a very different cosmology than the one we live in right now. It has been misunderstood and also used to justify oppressive social structures. It has been conflated with this idea of faith, so that there is premeditated destiny or punishment that gets doled out based on action. It has been used to justify a certain kind of suffering or passivity in the face of suffering, or as a kind of moralistic judgmental force in the world. Like anything, a word or a teaching can be used for harm or for good.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Shokuchi Deirdre Carrigan (06/23/2018)

Dharma talk by Shokuchi Deirdre Carrigan (06/23/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Where is balance? I know from my years of yoga: you can’t hold balance.  Balance is found each moment. And the very moment that you feel like you’re falling over, is the moment of balance. When you’re leaning against something or holding onto something…that’s leaning against, or holding on. Balance is this moment right before free-fall.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 4) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/17/2018)

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 4) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/17/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

When we observe sentient beings with eyes of compassion and that observation becomes whole hearted, each sentient being becomes a door to the Dharma. And when that door opens and we realize what we are being shown that is wisdom.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 3) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/16/2018)

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 3) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/16/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

In the observation of each and every living being with eyes of compassion, the door to the true Dharma opens. Observing each and every living being with eyes of compassion is the situation, is the practice, in which the true Dharma is seen, and heard, and maintained.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 2) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/15/2018)

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 2) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/15/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

No matter what comes, we welcome it. This is the way of Buddha. Whatever comes, welcome it. No matter how it looks, welcome it. And in fact, in reality, whatever comes you do welcome it. That’s your original nature.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 1) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/14/2018)

Listening to the Cries of the World (part 1) by Tenshin Reb Anderson (06/14/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Each of us has the job of being the person that the universe makes us and doing that completely involves listening to the cries of the world. I can’t be fully me without listening to everybody else. Because everybody else is included in me.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin: Cultivating the Great Compassion of Zen (05/19/2018)

Dharma talk by Laura O’Loughlin: Cultivating the Great Compassion of Zen (05/19/2018)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Dharma talk offered by Laura O’Loughin during the one-day sit at Brooklyn Zen Center on May 19, 2018.

Compassion, as we practice it in Buddhism, is the most radical act a human being can do – as well as the most natural. […] In Buddhism […] we say that our natural state of being is compassion and wisdom. And what we are doing in this practice is asking ourselves to come home to ourselves, to our heart, to our birthright. So it’s an act of regaining our dignity as human beings. And then, when we regain our dignity, offering that dignity to others. As the Dalai Lama puts it: “make our own heart our temple.” So what would it be like to walk around with your heart as your temple?

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Rohatsu Sesshin Day 7, by Teah Strozer (12/10/2017)

Rohatsu Sesshin Day 7, by Teah Strozer (12/10/2017)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Soshin Teah Strozer is Brooklyn Zen Center’s root teacher. Teah is a Zen Buddhist priest, dharma teacher, and lineage-holder in the Soto Zen tradition of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi. She received dharma transmission from Sojun Mel Weitsman and served as BZC’s guiding teacher until December 2017.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Rohatsu Sesshin Day 3, by Teah Strozer (12/06/2017)

Rohatsu Sesshin Day 3, by Teah Strozer (12/06/2017)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Soshin Teah Strozer is Brooklyn Zen Center’s root teacher. Teah is a Zen Buddhist priest, dharma teacher, and lineage-holder in the Soto Zen tradition of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi. She received dharma transmission from Sojun Mel Weitsman and served as BZC’s guiding teacher until December 2017.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Teah Strozer: Lay Practice Liberation Through The Urban Nest (10/21/2017)

Dharma talk by Teah Strozer: Lay Practice Liberation Through The Urban Nest (10/21/2017)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

When I looked out at most of the people who are practicing, they are not priests, you guys are lay people.  And I know a number of lay people who are wonderful in their practice, deep in their practice, and perfectly capable of holding out their hand and bringing other people across.  So, I feel rather strongly, if most of the people are going to be lay people, then why don’t we completely recognize, and confirm, and acknowledge, lay people as a legitimate path; completely legitimate practice opportunity.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.

Dharma talk by Teah Strozer: Keep a Cool Head (2017/10/20)

Dharma talk by Teah Strozer: Keep a Cool Head (2017/10/20)

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

This dharma talk was offered by Brooklyn Zen Center’s root teacher Teah Strozer during a three-day sesshin in 2017.

We have this war inside, because we think of ourselves as an object. Good and bad, right and wrong.  And we think of it as ‘my life’, which is eventually seen to be a mistake.  It’s not my life. It is Life, in fact, living itself as me for a moment; for like a blink of an eye.

Our audio dharma talks are offered free of charge and made possible by the donations we receive. If you would like to support Brooklyn Zen Center, please visit the “Giving” section of our website.